Tuesday, December 12th, 2017

Archives for March 2016

Ahmed Family

Welcome to NPCT’s Ahmed refugee family!

Ahmed Family

WHO:

Grandmother 70 years old

Mother 30 years old

Father 36 years old

Son 13 years old

Daughter 12 years old

Son 4 years old

 

WHY:

The decision to use an African family is multi-faceted. Not only are the projected 2016 arrival numbers comprised of a proposed 25,000 arrivals from Africa (see report here), but due to complicated racial dynamics in America the representation of a brown-skinned family from Africa allows for multiple entry points of dialogue related to race and the refugee experience.

Similarly related, the decision to represent the family as Muslim invites participants to think critically about the definition of being a “welcoming community” and the responsibility service providers have to understand the complex constellation of identities that our newest arrivals carry.

The Ahmed family is meant to reflect some of the clients you may be working with, to inspire conversation around tangible examples on our various training topics, and to be a common ground for critical thought related to enhancing mental health services.

Mental Health Screening Tools and Referral Network

The National Partnership of Community Training is pleased to present the webinar:

Mental Health Screening Tools and Referral Network

 

The objectives of this webinar are to:
  1. Discuss the importance of identifying and addressing refugee mental health issues through screenings
  2. Discuss how to implement effective screening tools in your programs and train staff on using various instruments
  3. Highlight three different programmatic approaches to using screening tools and building referral networks
  4. Address common barriers to streamlining screening results into effective referrals group.

This presenters for this webinar include:

  • Annie G. Bonz is a Mental Health Technical Advisor for U.S. and Global Health programs at IRC. She is a Licensed Creative Arts Therapist (LCAT) in New York and a National Board Certified Art Therapist (ATR-BC), with an MA in Art Therapy from New York University. In her current role, she provides technical guidance to IRC staff implementing mental health and psychosocial support programming.  Prior to joining IRC in August 2014, Annie worked with New York area non-profits in the design and implementation of trauma-informed psychotherapeutic services for children and adolescents, including the provision of clinical services for unaccompanied minors from Central America at an ORR shelter in New York.  She also spent nearly a decade in East Africa, serving in multiple leadership roles for refugee processing at the Church World Service Resettlement Support Center in Nairobi.  Her time based in East Africa included travel to refugee camps throughout Eastern, Central and Southern Africa, where she interviewed and provided support to teams interviewing refugees from across the region.  She also served as a Health Educator with Peace Corps (RPCV Kenya).  Throughout her career, Annie has provided technical support and training to field and program staff, integrating clinical and non-clinical programmatic best practices in service to individuals impacted by conflict and displacement.
  • Amber Gray has worked in refugee mental health and torture treatment since 1998. She established New Mexico’s Refugee Mental Health Program in 2007, where she was the Refugee Mental Health Coordinator for seven years. She is now a Clinical Advisor with the Center for Victims of Torture in Minneapolis.  She has consulted and provided clinical training on refugee mental health and torture treatment to more than 30 programs worldwide.  Amber is a frequent speaker on topics related to refugee mental health, torture treatment, and the integration of somatic and arts-based therapies into clinical work with survivors of trauma in cross cultural contexts. She is a co-author “Refugee Mental Health Screening” in the 2014 publication Refugee Health Care : An Essential Medical Guide (Annamalai, A. (ed.)) and has published many articles and chapters on related topics.
  • Sasha Verbillis-Kolp is a clinical social worker with a focus on global mental health, international development and forced migration studies. Recently, she served as the evaluation coordinator for the Pathways to Wellness project where she helped develop the Refugee Health Screener-15 (RHS-15) a mental health screening tool used to detect trauma, depression and anxiety symptoms in refugees. She provides consultation and technical assistance to health sites implementing mental health screening for refugees. She manages a program for psycho-social services for refugees in an outpatient mental health clinic in Portland Oregon. She focuses on community-level interventions for refugees that promote emotional health and well-being, culturally appropriate clinical assessment and treatment planning. She frequently lectures on refugee health disparities, cross-cultural treatment approaches and psycho-social interventions. She is chair of a Task Force for Refugee Emotional Health in the Portland area, and serves as an Oregon representative to the American Association of Refugee Health Coordinators- Refugee Emotional Wellness Work

Download a PDF of the slides here

Click the video below to view the webinar