Tuesday, October 21st, 2014

FACES project: Adele Gilbert Residential Treatment Facility

Adele Gilbert Residential Treatment Facility -formerly the 66th Street Group Home – is a residential treatment program for chronically mentally ill adults, many of whom have co-occurring substance abuse problems. The fully furnished residence houses up to 16 people and offers a homelike environment for recovery.

Charles

The road to recovery
goes down 66th Street.

The lines in one’s face tell a story. A person’s eyes recount his past. There is something in Charles’ face that reveals a hard past of frustration and pain. The exhaustion is there, too, right beside pinpoints of suffering. The lines in one’s face tell a story. A person’s eyes recount his past. There is something in Charles’ face that reveals a past of frustration and pain. The exhaustion is there too, but beneath that stolid exterior is a strong, stable and happy person.

Charles was a resident at the 66th Street Group Home, a treatment and rehabilitative home for men and women with mental illness and substance abuse issues. When Charles arrived, he brought with him his emotional baggage and bad habits.

He wanted to get rid of both.

With the help of the wonderful people at the 66th Street Group Home, Charles achieved sobriety and worked with the staff and doctors to find the right medication for his needs. He fought to receive Social Security Disability Income and to put his

finances in order. This time, he had the oversight and encouragement from people upon whom he could rely. Charles also worked on mending broken relationships, both with his family and his friends. It seems as if Charles was trying to find balance in his life and the 66th Street Group Home provided the scales and measures.

Charles’ personality made him an instant friend to many of the other residents. He was very talkative and had close relationships with his peers. It was hard for everyone when, after two years at the group home, Charles moved on. Charles loved the 66th Street Group Home and had become very comfortable there. He didn’t want to leave. Because he had been so successful with the program, getting sober and taking his medication regularly, the staff who loved him so dearly urged him to continue on his path to recovery. Charles graduated to a less restrictive living facility and has adjusted well.

Everyone tries to find balance in their lives, but some find it more difficult than others. Charles had been in and out of state hospitals before his stay at the 66th Street Group Home. It was

the caring, close relationships borne out of that healing environment that helped Charles recover. When you look at his face, don’t be fooled—behind that stony façade is a man turned away from the road to ruin and is instead on the pathway of success.

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